SR

Proposals for a New Commonwealth of the Republics of ex-Yugoslavia

Publisher
Peace and Crises Management Foundation
Dositejeva 4, 11 000 Belgrade

Author
Boris VUKOBRAT

Co-authors
Elisabeth KOPP, Professor Jean- François AUBERT, Professor Aloïs RIKLIN, Professor Kurt ROTHSCHILD, Professor Vojislav STANOVČIĆ

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FOREWORD FROM MR. BORIS VUKOBRAT

The war ravaging my country, Yugoslavia, will not last forever. One day the arms will be silent, peace will reign, and life will return to the devastated towns and villages. And on that day it will be necessary for the Republics of the former Yugoslav Federation to learn to coexist once again.

The proposals that I present here in the name of the Peace and Crisis Management Foundation do not claim to settle the innumerable problems that the people and their leaders will face at that moment. Their purpose is to establish a framework general enough to serve as a basis for political dialogue but precise enough to approach the totality of the questions that must imperatively be resolved.

There are no quick and sure answers to the questions raised today by the Yugoslav drama. But there is at least one that Europe can bring to the peoples who have been the victims of this war: it consists in integrating, without delay, the Republics born of the break-up of Yugoslavia into the European Economic Area, in recognizing them as the link which unites South-East Europe with Western Europe. This is possible without overturning the institutional edifice constructed by the twelve member countries of the European Community as soon as one extends the free circulation of people, goods, and capital to all the Yugoslav Republics.

It is absolutely essential that voices be raised immediately to propose to the peoples involved a peaceful means to resolving the conflict. Thus, we have drawn up a general political program -the Proposals which form the first part of this book- and have submitted them to a group of internationally renowned experts -the Documents which make up the second part of this work.

I know very well that our project cannot serve as the basis for the political and economic reorganization of the Yugoslav territory as long as the war continues. But I also know that it is not necessary to hope in order to tackle a problem and I firmly believe that the moment has come to offer our peoples a reasonable hope.

Boris Vukobrat